Japanese Katagami stencilling class with indigo – Sunday 21st October – 10am – 4pm

Japanese Katagami stencilling class with indigo – Sunday 21st October – 10am – 4pm

£100.00

Japanese Katagami stencilling class with indigo - Sunday 21st October - 10am - 4pm    

6 in stock

Japanese Katagami stencilling class with indigo – Sunday 21st October – 10am – 4pm

The Japanese craft of Katagami (stencil cutting) has been around for hundreds of years, with craftsmen making the most delicate and detailed patterns and representations of nature.

Katagami stencils are made from Japanese washi paper, soaked and bonded together by the juice of the Persimmon fruit and other secret ingredients and then dried and smoked to create an almost entirely waterproof paper, ideal for stencil work.

 

In this full day class you will learn about:

 

The rice paste used as a resist for all Katazome(stencilling with indigo)
How to make and maintain an indigo vat and dye with indigo
Stencilling with leaves and other found objects
Cutting your own simple stencil which you can take away with you as a souvenir
How to paste fabric for dyeing with a variety of stencils including your own, those made by the tutor and some modern Japanese stencils
How to use a persimmon paper cone to draw with paste
You will use your stencils to dye a number of samples
A white cotton tote bag to stencil as a project is included in the price

 

Your tutor will also explain about the history of Katagamistencilling in Japan, the four types of stencil cutting techniques and show you a number of vintage stencils, including some from the Edo and Meiji periods.

 

London-based Romor Designs was formed in the autumn of 2015 by Rob Jones, a shibori textiles designer and natural dyer. Having discovered Shibori, the ancient Japanese art of resist dyeing, at West Dean college, Rob went on to study in Japan under indigo guru, Bryan Whitehead. Rob’s passion is in finding the new in the old, building on the tradition and centuries of skill that shibori has behind it. He believes in taking work in new directions by combining techniques and inventing his own forms.

“The shibori techniques that speak to me are the ones that embrace the life that’s in the fabric and dyes themselves. ”

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